What You Need To Know About Microbeads


Your toothpaste and face scrub probably get their scrubbing power from tiny plastic beads contained within. In Episode 10 of Speaking of Chemistry, Lauren K. Wolf talks about these polyethylene “microbeads” and why environmental scientists and dentists alike are nervous about them getting into lakes, rivers, and your gums.

If this episode leaves you wanting more, read the sources below. Speaking of Chemistry is a production of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly magazine of the American Chemical Society.

Contact us at speakingofchem@acs.org!

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Microplastic Beads Pollute Great Lakes
C&EN Volume 91 Issue 37 | pp. 23-25
Issue Date: September 16, 2013

DentalBuzz: Crest Toothpaste Embeds Plastic In Our Gums

Drawing a Bead On Microbeads
C&En Volume 92 Issue 24 | p. 6
Issue Date: June 16, 2014

Plastic Pollution Harms Marine Life
C&En Volume 91 Issue 49 | p. 8
Issue Date: December 9, 2013

Posted in Recent Episodes
One comment on “What You Need To Know About Microbeads
  1. Our 8th graders enjoyed this video today! I will have to search your archives for more. Lauren is awesome!

2 Pings/Trackbacks for "What You Need To Know About Microbeads"
  1. […] Of all the things I’ve observed since arriving as Publisher in 2013, the knowledge, passion and sheer talent of the extraordinary editorial staff at C&EN stands above all else. So it is particularly gratifying to note two recent examples where the skill and professionalism of C&EN reporters has been recognized by their peers. In September, Assistant Managing Editor Cheryl Hogue won a first-place award from the Society of Environmental Journalists (SEJ) annual Reporting on the Environment Awards for a series of stories on man-made pollutants such as exfoliating microbead products. […]

  2. […] Of all the things I’ve observed since arriving as Publisher in 2013, the knowledge, passion and sheer talent of the extraordinary editorial staff at C&EN stands above all else. So it is particularly gratifying to note two recent examples where the skill and professionalism of C&EN reporters has been recognized by their peers. In September, Assistant Managing Editor Cheryl Hogue won a first-place award from the Society of Environmental Journalists (SEJ) annual Reporting on the Environment Awards for a series of stories on man-made pollutants such as exfoliating microbead products. […]

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